Interview: Ana Neves

Another issue on our series of interviews with people that embody the very spirit Mailcube strives to achieve: inventiveness and out-of-the-box thinking with productivity and quality of life in mind.

Ana Neves is an IT engineer that has dedicated her life to digital interaction and the tools we use for it. As one of Portugal’s leading web citizenship enthusiasts, she has promoted countless seminar projects (check her platform KMOL for details). In 2001 she founded Knowman, a consulting firm that specializes in knowledge management.

Mailcube: How did your career in corporate consulting begin? Is it something that’s always motivated you, or was there one specific moment when it all started to make sense?

Ana Neves: I’ve always liked listening to other people. And helping out. In the year before I graduated, I fell in love with organizations, with the way people worked and learned together – or didn

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Interview: Gonçalo Gil Mata, Part 2

So far, we have endeavoured to explore the topography of email usage – first by tracing the pitfalls associated with its use, and then by attempting to climb the heights this technology can aspire to. Now, we begin a series of profiles on people that embody the very spirit Mailcube strives to achieve: inventiveness and out-of-the-box thinking with productivity and quality of life in mind.

Gonçalo Gil Mata is a computer engineer and founder of Mind4Time, a coaching company with a focus on better time management. On the occasion of the publishing of his latest book, we sat with him for a conversation on email and beyond. This is part two of that interview.

Mailcube: Earlier we were discussing your recommendations for clients regarding email. How about personal rules? How do you handle email?

Gonçalo Mata: My work revolves around keynote speaking, training, seminars and coaching. This means I have long

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Interview: Gonçalo Gil Mata, Part 1

So far, we have endeavored to explore the topography of email usage – first by tracing the pitfalls associated with its use, and then by attempting to climb the possible heights this technology can aspire to. Now, we begin a series of profiles on people that embody the very spirit Mailcube strives to achieve: inventiveness and out-of-the-box thinking with productivity and quality of life in mind.

Gonçalo Gil Mata is a computer engineer and founder of Mind4Time, a coaching company with a focus on better time management. On the occasion of the publishing of his latest book, we sat with him for a conversation on email and beyond. This is part one of that interview.

Mailcube: Starting off right at the beginning: you began your career in a very straightforward job in IT, correct?

Gonçalo Mata: I had a very traditional early career, both by choice – as I wanted to have

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Saddled up and ready to go: making the most out of file attachments

Despite the emergence of cloud storage, temporary hosting and document-sharing platforms , sending files via email is still the most practical option. Count on users to make it as impractical as we can.

Text, graphics, audio, video – by now your inbox is a multimedia database via all the file attachments you’ve collected. But this database isn’t structured around those care packages, but rather around the envelopes they arrive in. All sorts of problems arise from this, both immediate and future.

Services like WeTransfer have become popular, for their larger filesize restrictions and ease of sharing across platforms. These solutions, however, present themselves merely temporary and are far from ideal when critical files are necessary at a later date.
We now try to list some of the more annoying pains involving email attachments, and provide safeguards to help dealing with them.

Immediate pains

Organization – Try to have a folder exclusively

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Master and Servant: turning the tables on email’s grip on your time

With the current ease of access, checking your email is more of a compulsion than a task. But cutting down on the number of times you visit your inbox may save you time at the end of the day.

Technology seems to work in a curious way: just when you’re getting used to the way it improves your life, new problems seem to arise from it. Take the automobile, for example. It enables you to travel faster and in comfort from A to B, but how comfortable do you feel when you’re pushing a couple of inches per minute on a traffic jam – or circling the block trying to find a place to park? Public transportation isn’t always practical, so it takes some planning and forward thinking to make the best use out of your mechanical horse technology.

Email seems similarly afflicted. With handheld platforms making it

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Dr. Frankenstein's Inbox – the email overload we're all guilty of

The insurmountable pile of unread email in our inboxes is a shared nightmare. So why aren't we doing something about it?

Whether you use email in a professional or personal capacity, we all wake up every morning to the same obscene number between brackets - letting us know exactly how much unread email we can look forward to spending time dealing with. With more or less diligence, the most important of the lot gets sorted away. Maybe one or two fall through a crack in our attention. Maybe something that demands action gets postponed, only to never be remembered again. But we know that eventually the inbox is going to fill up again. It gets so we start to envy Sysyphus and his comparatively simpler task of rolling a boulder uphill.

No, it's not just you. A McKinsey report found that among American corporate workers, up to 28% of their

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